Chronological

Editors Note: Postural Homeostasis is a collection of Dr Wilfred Barlow’s writings on the Alexander Technique from 1944 to 1982. Barlow attempted some of the first studies of the Alexander Technique, and many of his papers were published in journals such as The British Medical Journal and The Lancet. Barlow is a figure
How do Alexander teachers talk about the Alexander Technique? In this essay, Patrick Johnson writes about his experience teaching science workshops to Alexander teachers with Tim Cacciatore and how common ways of talking about the Alexander Technique can reinforce out-of-date scientific ideas and faulty reasoning. By learning to clearly separate
In August, 2018, Dr. Rajal Cohen was a featured speaker for one of three plenary sessions at the International Alexander Technique Congress in Chicago. Her talk, “Science Catches Up,” provides an overview of current research on the phenomena and concepts that underly the Alexander Technique. She discusses research from her

Debunking Body Tensegrity (Video)

Posted by Patrick Johnson on August 26, 2019

Category: Biomechanics
Alexander Technique teachers aren’t alone among somatics practitioners in thinking that tensegrity is a good model for the musculoskeletal system. In this 20-minute talk first given to Australian Alexander Technique teachers during their 2018 Science and the Alexander Technique Webinar, Patrick Johnson goes in-depth on tensegrity. He shows that the
In this post, Dr. Rajal Cohen discusses how the Alexander Technique concept of faulty sensory appreciation or debauched kinesthesia intersects with the science of sensation and perception. Alexander Technique teachers refer at times to faulty sensory appreciation, unreliable sensory appreciation, or debauched kinesthesia to explain why a student may feel

The Physics of Sit-to-Stand

Posted by Patrick Johnson on August 5, 2019

This essay by Tim Cacciatore and Patrick Johnson on the biomechanics of sit-to-stand was originally published in STAT News, Fall 2016. Sit-to-stand is one of the essential movements that Alexander Technique teachers use to teach. We generally leave the mechanical details of the movement aside and focus on teaching inhibition
This essay by Tim Cacciatore discusses his 2014 study, “Neuromechanical Interference of Posture on Movement: Evidence from Alexander Technique Teachers Rising from a Chair,” published in the Journal of Neurophysiology. The study documents the striking difference between healthy, untrained subjects and Alexander teachers in standing up unusually slowly and smoothly
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